Marimo Moss Ball FAQs

By | November 4, 2018
This page contains common questions about marimo moss balls, including marimo care, facts, sizing, color, and more. These questions are common ones we get sent from readers (like you!) via email and contains our replies to them so everyone can benefit from this information.
This FAQ is constantly updated as we get more questions. If you have one to ask, just leave a comment here or contact us and ask your question!
All of the following questions are real questions from real readers.
Last updated: 1/15/19.

Seachem Prime and Marimos

Question: We have hard water here in Dallas; and you mentioned Prime by Seachem.  My Marimo is in a glass container that only has maybe 1-1.5 gallons of water (including the original water the moss ball was living in).  How much Prime would I use for a small batch of water like what I have?  I bought a dechlorinator and put a drop in the water and swished it around.  Prime would take care of the dechlorination and eliminate the water hardness?
Answer: Prime is definitely my go-to choice for dechlorinating water and I’d recommend it for your marimo even in such a small container.
For your case, I’d just do a single drop into the glass container and let it diffuse by itself. That’s more than enough to dechlorinate even a container with a volume doubly yours. You seem to already have it down!
As for the water hardness, Prime doesn’t really remove minerals from the water (especially calcium), but more so used for removing chlorine, chloramine, heavy metals, etc. The solution will make your water safe for fish/marimos, but won’t reduce your overall hardness. It’s kind of confusing, but the easiest way I can put it is that it’ll take out all the dangerous stuff, but not the inert, neutral stuff. And minerals are often inert and neutral, so they stay in the water, which keeps your water hard.
There are other solutions on the market that lower water hardness and much more expensive solutions (such as using an RO system, distilled water, or remineralizing water (using pure water and adding minerals to “taste”), but for the casual marimo keeper, those are overkill!
If your goal is to lower your hardness, Prime isn’t the most effective option. But if you just want to make your water safe for marimos, Prime will do wonders.
Water hardness won’t really harm your marimos, and some mineral content is beneficial. But if you see white streaks, that’s a sign of too many minerals and that’s when you should worry. I’ve used it with live fish in a 10-gallon tank and two drops would work just fine- this stuff is super concentrated and is safe even for “overdosing.”

Can moss balls survive in a closed container?

Question: Hi, I recently got three marimo balls and they are in a glass jar with a cork top. I have read many articles to find the answer to my question and I haven’t yet. Can I keep the cork lid on the jar or does it need to be open for air to circulate through the jar? Thank you for your help and I look forward to your response.
Answer: You’ll want to keep the cork lid loose or use a permeable one to allow air flow. Marimo moss balls won’t stay green for long without a source of oxygen. Since light hits the jar, they’ll undergo photosynthesis (they’re really just algae balls) and this process requires a constant air supply in order for them survive. Without proper air supply, they’ll likely brown in a few weeks when all the air has been used up in the jar since it’s pretty much a closed system.

How fast do moss balls grow?

Question: How fast or slow do these grow?  Did I miss that info on your page?
Answer: They grow pretty slow- actually, really slow. About an inch per 5-8 years.

Moldy moss balls

Question: I just got mine yesterday. It turned dark green when I washed it then put it in my ten-gallon tank. I have 3 small bettas and two platies. This morning it has turned a yellowish olive green kinda brownish in spots. I took it out in put in a stainless steel bowl with cool water and a tiny bit of sea salt. I washed it out again then put it back in the tank. It still looks like a moldy kind of color
Answer: It’s probably stressed from the shipping and the changing water conditions. It’ll need some time (like 2-3 weeks) for it to adapt to new water parameters. Browning, stringy, and dark-colored algae are all completely normal when you first adapt them to your water!
I’d suggest leaving it in the aquarium with indirect light and letting it sit for a few weeks. If you have plant fertilizer, just a small dose will help tremendously. Marimos are really just spheres of algae, which act and behave just like any other aquatic plant. Aquarium plants all have a period where they adjust to new water parameters and change how they grow by killing off old growth and growing new algae that are suited for their environment.

Betta fish and marimos

Question: Hi guys!  My plan is to add small ones to my small aquarium with a fish.  Are these Marimo free of bacteria or parasites that could attack my Betta?

Answer: They’re free from parasites, bacteria, and other nasties as they come from natural sources and then quarantined afterward for a week.

However, nothing is guaranteed in the aquarium world. You’d be surprised at home many major pet stores label their plants as “snail free” only to have baby snails surface on the glass two weeks later!
If you’re paranoid about hitchhikers getting into your betta’s aquarium, you can quarantine them. Just get a small container with some clean water and add a drop of plant fert if you have some. Leave it somewhere with indirect sunlight for about two weeks and check for snails, oily water, and browning marimos. If everything looks good, they’re ready to go! This will also give them some time to recover from the shipment.

Marimo and calcium buildup

Question: Hi! I have a couple of questions about Marimo care.

Firstly, in your care section, you mention leaving the container open to the air, with no lid. However, most of the pictures you have up show the containers with lids. What’s up with that?

Secondly, my marimos have tiny hard, white bumps on their strands. Is this what they are supposed to look like?

Answer: Good eye! Thanks for pointing that out. Marimos can be stored safely in capped container temporarily, but eventually, need access to available oxygen/nitrogen in the air. This is important for photosynthesis, as marimos are really just balls of algae clumped together! If they’re stored long-term in a closed system, they’ll start to rot and break down. The images are sourced from around the web and not necessarily our own pictures. They’re licensed for commercial use, so we picked out a few that we found showed off the marimo in its glory!

As for your question, it’s likely due to hard water buildup. It’s probably calcium and a mix of other minerals that form over time from water, or even in the lake if the marimo isn’t free to move around. This can be rectified by simply cleaning them using a pair of tweezers and picking those strands off. If the issue persists, consider using R/O or distilled water, or doing more water changes. I don’t know what setup you have, so I’m just throwing some broad suggestions out there. It depends on your setup.

Lid or no lid?

Question: I change the water weekly since I change it that often is it ok to have a lid on, or should I opt for no lid?
As for the buildup, I have been using spring water because the tap here is basically pool water. I guess the mineral content is too high? Are the calcium deposits harmful to the Marimos? I will try using distilled and see if that helps 🙂
Answer: If you change the water weekly, that should be enough to get fresh O2 into the habitat from the water and from merely exposing the tank to the atmosphere. So I think you’ll be fine there. Just be careful of temp swings- the hotter it gets, the more difficult it gets to absorb O2 in the water. If you see condensation, you should pop the top.
Yeah, the tap water will kill them over time. Treated municipal water will do a lot of harm, so good on you for the spring water. But even then, it contains natural minerals (and sometimes added minerals) which may cause buildup. You can try a 50/50 mixture of distilled and spring water on your next water change and see how it goes from there. The calcium deposits shouldn’t really affect them other than cosmetically- as long as they’re not like engulfed in calcium, they should be okay.

Moss ball shedding

Question: Hi, for a long time now, since I got my moss ball in May, it seems like it is shedding. Whenever I go to chance the water every two weeks, there are little brown flakes everywhere in the water, and a lot of them. Is this normal for a marimo ball? I also am wondering if my marimo ball needs a current? I have mine sitting in stagnant water.
Answer: Is your marimo housed by itself? Or are there other inhabitants in the habitat with it?
And by water, do you mean you’re doing a water change to the container? Or is it sitting in a pool of water and you’re adding to it? Is it submerged or just partially submerged?
I’m assuming you have it sitting in a container with water and you’re adding to it every other week. If this is the case, the brown flakes could be algae growth that’s slowly growing on the marimo and the water you add flushes them off. This isn’t necessarily alarming, as algae and other beneficial bacteria will grow in any pool of water over time, but excessive lighting from indoor lights or the sun speeds up the process.
Also, the stagnant water definitely is a factor if the above is correct. No water movement means it’s a lot easier for bacteria to grow in place. Adding a small bubbler will do wonders and give it a nice ripple effect- though this may not be applicable to your specific setup! In nature, they’re found on lakebeds rolling around at the bottom gathering moss, pretty much. so there’s always a small current pushing them around as they “snowball” more algae and grow.
In your case, I’d first try moving it somewhere with slightly less light. If that doesn’t work or if it’s not possible, then adding a small bubbler should do the trick. They’re cheap and can be bought for $6 shipped online. And they barely use any power even running 24/7- probably just a few cents per year.

Do marimo balls need food?

Question: I have a happy little moss ball that shares my office. According to your website’s descriptions, it seems to be doing fine and has actually grown a little. I have had it for about 10 months. My question: do marimos need food? I’ve seen this food on Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Luffy-Plump-Your-marimo-Fertilizer/dp/B00OLPMPYY, and wonder if it is a scam. If marimos do need to be fed, what do you suggest?
Thanks.
Answer: To keep it simple- they don’t need food necessarily as algae will grow with just light =]. If you want them to be vibrant in color, you could try adding a dose of plant fertilizer for aquariums. But they should do fine with just sunlight and regular water changes.
Let me know if you have any other questions.

Thanks.

 

Do marimos provide enough oxygen for betta fish?

Question: If I have 3 Marimos in a 1-2 gallon aquarium with one Beta would the Marimos produce sufficient dissolved oxygen for the Beta to survive comfortably?
Also, what is the stick-like brown branch that is often seen in pictures with the Marimos?
Many thanks!
Answer: Marimo balls will likely produce minimal free oxygen for a live betta fish in a small aquarium. I would tell you to look into using a bubbler, but I believe betta fish prefer stagnant water over turbulent currents- as they’re natively found in rice paddy fields which have no current.
If you’re worried about getting enough O2 for the fish, you could always use a small bubbler with a softener to minimize the bubble splashing. This would circulate the water and provide more free O2 and nutrients for the fish and the marimos (they’re basically algae which will need free nutrients to grow).
The brown branch you see is often a thin driftwood variant. You can easily replicate the same effect by finding a twig or stick, boiling it to kill free parasites, then waterlogging it so it sinks! This will save you some cash if you don’t want to spend on driftwood since it’s relatively expensive.
Let me know if you have any other questions about marimos!

Green slime and marimos

Question: My teacher has two Marimo Balls and they have seem to grown a very large thick layer of slime stuff (about an inch thick) over the both of them binding them together. I pulled the slime layer off, but some of it is literally bound to the ball. They also look very dark green and have some spots of brown and white dots. Long story short they look very unhealthy and gross. I was just wondering if you had any tips on how to get them looking normal and healthy again.

Thanks!

Answer: It sounds like you’re having a case of “green slime” as they call it in the aquarium hobbyist world. This stuff is very thick, slimy, and sticks coherently as one fabric of slime that’s a pain to get rid of. It may also have an odor and forms across the top of the water surface when given enough time.
This is usually caused by overfeeding, too much lighting, or poor water conditions that allow algae to flourish. If there’s also too much plant fertilizer being used, that could also cause the slime to form.
I’d start by minimizing feeding (if applicable) or moving the container away from bright lighting (if it’s by a window or under a light). If plant fert is being used, cut the doses in half. And water can be partially changed (20-30%) once a week.
Lastly, the slime will have to manually be removed by hand or aquarium tongs. Remove it whenever you see it and keep up the maintenance. If you leave it there, it’ll prosper and just reform over time. Be diligent and remove it at first sight!
Do all this for two weeks and it should get rid of the green slime.
Let me know if you have any other questions.
Thanks.

Rolled marimos – fake or real?

Question: I ordered a Marimo from a different site (I had wanted to order them from you but my debit card wouldn’t work) but today I found out they are artificially rolled from filaments from lake Akan.  Is this a common practice since Marimos can’t be removed from their natural lakes?  Their contact page is defunct and y’all seem trustworthy.  I’m just curious if this is how most marimos are sourced.

Answer: Sadly, that’s the nature of a lot of marimos nowadays.
In nature, they form on the bottom of lakebeds by rolling up and “snowballing” themselves into spheres over the course of many years.
When they’re rolled, they basically use the “scraps” of other marimos and just mush it into a spherical ball. This is obviously an unnatural process and is like trying to force a marimo into existence.
Some lakes prohibit removal, but I’m not 100% clear on the laws. It’s possible that they couldn’t remove it from the lake and had to roll them artificially, but there’s no proof of that as far as I know.
Please let me know if you have any other questions.

2 thoughts on “Marimo Moss Ball FAQs

  1. Rudje

    I’m thinking about getting a marimo as a beginner aquarium plant, and I was wondering if it would be healthy for them to have something blocking light to the tank for part of the day? I live in a place that gets a lot of sun most of the year as well as with five people with erratic schedules, and I don’t want an excess or lack of light to stress out the pet orb(s). I know they’re native to latitudes much farther north than I am and I don’t want the light change to be too stressful.

    Reply
    1. Anthony (BallsOfMoss) Post author

      Hey Rudje,

      Marimos are perfect beginner plants because they’re one of the lowest maintenance aquatic plants you could possibly get. Lighting, in my experience, seems to be one of the more flexible necessities to them as they adapt to various conditions and lighting frequencies. I’ve tried full spectrum lights for 12H, 4 on/4 off (supposedly helps with photosynthesis), and even just ambient lighting from the lamps in the house and I’ve experienced mixed results, with more light meaning healthier marimos- generally.

      If you’re afraid of blasting them with too much lux, you can definitely partially block the light or use something to diffuse it. I wouldn’t worry too much about the inconsistency in the lighting schedule as they grow very slowly and will definitely show signs of inadequate lighting and give you plenty of time to rectify the problem. If they start to turn into an unhealthy coloration, you can play around with the lighting schedule to fix it.

      Another solution is to simply place them away from outdoor lighting and just use an aquarium LED on a timer or manually turn it on/off daily. This is what I use for my setups and it works since there’s not much light where I set my marimos other than some table lamps which are only on during the night.

      Let me know if you have any other questions.
      Thanks.

      Reply

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